Preparing for Worship - October 9, 2016

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This Sunday we continue in our series on the Psalms but we will take a break from Psalm 119 to look at Psalm 51. We'll be discussing moral failure, what to do with our own moral failure, confession of sin, and forgiveness. To view our full liturgy click here. Below are the songs we will sing together. One of them (We Will Feast in the House of Zion) will be introduced for the first time this Sunday.

1. HOW GREAT THOU ART

Style: We will be blending traditional and contemporary elements in this song. The melody and chords will be the familiar, traditional arrangement though we will play this song a bit more up-tempo with an alt-country feel.

Song Info: This well known hymn has a long translation history. It is based on a poem written in Swedish, then translated into German, then into Russian, then into English from the Russian. Stuart K Hine is responsible for the English version that we all know, which originated in 1949. The melody is a traditional Swedish melody. This hymn is one of the most popular of all time, second only to Amazing Grace.

This hymn makes an excellent call to worship because it is all about approaching God with an attitude of praise and thanksgiving. We are taught in Scripture to come into his presence of God with praise and thanksgiving before we come with requests or even confession of sin.

Sheet MusicAudio

2. GOOD SHEPHERD OF MY SOUL

Style: This is a contemporary hymn played in a celtic-folk style. It is mid-tempo and prayerful.

Song Info: This song comes to us from Stuart Townend, Keith and Kristin Getty, and Fionan de Barra. It is a prayer that Christ would dwell within us, transform our lives, and mold us into Christ-likeness. It especially reflects on the difficulty of this journey living in a fallen world. My favorite line is this:

I’ll walk this narrow road
With Christ before me,
Where thorns and thistles grow
And cords ensnare me.
Though doubted and denied,
He never leaves my side,
But lifts my head and calls me to follow.

"Thorns and thistles" is a reference to the fallen world in which we live. We walk with Christ on a narrow road in a land of thorns and thistles. The way of the Christian is difficult. But the good news is that we walk with Christ. Though we doubt him, deny him, and fail him countless times he is always with us, lifting us up and calling us anew to continue following him.

"for the righteous falls seven times and rises again..." (Proverbs 24:16)

"Seven times" indicates completion. Our failure and our sin is complete. It couldn't get any more sinful. Yet because of the presence of Christ with us we rise again and continue on the way. We cannot help but do so thanks to his grace.

Sheet MusicAudio

3. ONLY YOUR BLOOD IS ENOUGH

Style: This is a contemporary and mid-tempo song. It has an indie-rock feel.

Song Info: This song was produced as part of a collection that Sojourn Church produced of re-tooled Isaac Watts hymns. Though this song is unique enough to be considered original, it is adapted from Isaac Watt's Psalm 51 Part 2. The lyrics and music were written by Neil Robins and it was released onOver the Grave in 2009. This song is appropriate at this point in the service because it recognizes the need for a savior. We have sung about God's goodness, our sin, and now we will sing about our need for a savior. As the song says: "No bleeding bird, no bleeding beast, no hyssop branch, no priest, no running brook, no flood, no sea can wash away this stain from me. Only your blood is enough to cover my sin." Here, with an eye on our sin, we ought to prepare our hearts to hear the sermon and to hear about the hope we have in the gospel of Christ.

Chords & LyricsAudio

4. We Will Feast in the House of Zion

Style: This is a contemporary, mid-tempo song that comes out of Nashville. It is prayerful and has a folk-rock flavor.

Song info: Appearing on her 2015 release Psalms, this song is a favored tune from Sandra McCracken. Since its publication is has enjoyed such honor as being The Gospel Coalition's official anthem for their 2015 annual conference. The entire album, including this song, was wrought out of a season of grief for McCracken as she struggled through the dissolution of her marriage due to infidelity. Many of the songs on Psalms are lament songs - songs expressing grief and pain to God. This is appropriate because most of the Psalms are Psalms of lament. Songs like this teach us how to direct our grief, anger, and sorrow toward God who is our healer.

This song is not based on any one Psalm but draws on themes from many of the "songs of Zion" that are found in the Psalter such as Psalms 46, 48, 76, 84, 87, and 122. This song also draws on themes found in Psalms of confidence such as Psalms 115, 125, and 129.

Lead Sheet, Audio

5. CHRIST THE LORD IS RISEN TODAY

Style: We will be singing the traditional version of this famous easter-hymn. It is up-tempo and celebratory.

Song info: This is a hymn written for Easter by Charles Wesley in 1739. Yet even in 1739, Christian song writers were taking older hymns and contemporizing them. This one was based on an older hymn by the same name that came from the 14th century. The words are set to the tune Lyra Davidica which comes from John Baptist Walsh in 1708. The content of this song focuses on the resurrection of Jesus and what it means for us. It is heavily imbued with Scripture and connects Jesus' resurrection with our hope of resurrection.

Sheet MusicAudio

See you Sunday!