Preparing for Worship - October 7, 2018

Join us this Sunday as we continue in our series in Hebrews. Approaching the end of the letter, we look this week at Hebrews 10:19-25 which contains the famous lines: “And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, an all the more as you see the Day drawing near.” (Hebrews 10:24-25). Here are the songs we’ll sing together:

1. Rejoice (Come and Stand Before Your Maker)

Style: This is a contemporary, up-tempo song that is perfect for a call to worship.

Song Info: This song was written as a collaborative effort between two of my favorite worship artists: Stuart Townend and Dustin Kensrue. It first appeared on Kensrue's 2013 album The Water and the Blood - in my opinion one of the greatest modern worship albums released in a long time. This song calls us to rejoice in the Lord, our maker. It leads us to sing and meditate on God's infinite perfections. It's appropriate here because we should come to God first with praise and adoration. Before we confess our sin, before we acknowledge our needs, before we make any requests we ought to first praise God and adore him for who he is.

Sheet MusicAudio

2. I Believe in God the Father

Style: This hymn has been around in various forms for a long time. The tune itself is a popular Sacred Harp tune from 1844 - Beech Spring. It has a Celtic or Appalachian sound and is mellow and prayerful.

Song Info: This particular arrangement was produced recently by Daniel Justice Snoke and released on a Cardiphonia compilation. The lyrics are a stylized version of the Apostles' Creed. From early times the church has considered the Apostles' Creed to be a full yet succinct definition of the gospel. We don't normally think of it as a proclamation of the gospel because it contains much more than just the cross and resurrection.

But in the Heidelberg Catechism, a revered reformation document, Question 22 asks: "What then must a Christian believe?" Answer: "Everything God promises us in the gospel. That gospel is summarized for us in the articles of our Christian faith -- a creed beyond doubt, and confessed throughout the world." The Catechism goes on to cite and unpack the entirety of the Apostles' Creed.

Sheet MusicAudio

3. Come Ye Sinners

Style: We will be playing a contemporary, modified version of this hymn. One of the shining virtues of the traditional hymn is its haunting melody. Thankfully, the version we are playing preserves the original melody and nearly all of the original lyrics. It's updated slightly to suit popular modern tastes.

Song Info: The lyrics were written by Joseph Hart in the 18th century. Hart was a hymn writer and minister in London, but he did not become converted until age 45. For much of his life he lived in opposition to God. This hymn seems particularly suited to his story. My favorite line is: "Come ye weary, heavy laden, lost and ruined by the fall. If you tarry til you're better you will never come at all." This version of the song was arranged and produced by Sojourn Church in Louisville Kentucky. Sojourn is a young, but large, reformed congregation in Louisville that is responsible for producing much excellent music and planting many healthy churches around the United States.

ChordsAudio

4. Jesus Paid it All

Style: We will play this song in its traditional style. It is low-tempo and prayerful.

Song Info: This hymn comes to us from the nineteenth century. The tune was written by John Grape (originally called "All to Christ I Owe") and the lyrics were written by Elvina Hall. This is a great song to sing after the sermon to prepare our hearts to celebrate the Lord's Supper. God's word preached exposes our sin and guilt before God, our misery, our helplessness, but also exposes God's great provision in Christ. We are debtors before God, but Jesus paid it all. The refrain expresses the spirit in which we should celebrate communion perfectly. When we receive the Lord's Supper we simultaneously acknowledge 1) that Jesus paid it all and we need his atoning sacrifice and 2) that we owe him everything - our entire lives. To receive Christ in communion is to receive him as both Savior and Lord. Jesus paid it all; All to Him I owe. That is the refrain of the Christian life.

Sheet MusicAudio

5. And Can It Be?

Style: We will play the traditional music for this song while including drums. It will be the familiar tune with a bit more energy.

Song Info: This hymn is likely one of the best loved of Charles Wesley's 6000 hymns that he wrote. The song was written in 1738 as a celebration of Wesley's conversion. The line: "I woke, the dungeon flamed with light/ my chains fell off, my heart was free/ I rose went forth and followed thee" are often quoted in sermons. This song fits well at this point in worship because we are acknowledging our need for conversion. Some of us need to be converted for the first time, some of us need a fresh experience of grace to stir up our obedience. We look to hear of God's grace in the sermon that follows.

Sheet MusicAudio

See you Sunday!