Preparing for Worship - June 19, 2016

You can view our full liturgy by clicking here. Here are the songs we'll sing together this Sunday. Song #4 is new for us this week so take some time to familiarize yourself with it.

1. GRACE ALONE

Style: This a contemporary song done in an up-tempo, indie rock style.

Song Info: Here is another tune written by Dustin Kensrue and appearing on his 2013 The Water and the Blood. This is one of my favorite worship songs written in a long time. What I love most about it is its unapologetic ode to God's pure grace. This song focuses on biblical and reformed themes of salvation by grace alone - that God has invaded our lives with his salvation. He has transformed our hearts and made us want to respond to his grace. He has done everything in our salvation and he alone ought to receive the glory. This tune attempts to give him just that. This is a good song for a call to worship because it approaches the Father with a humble heart overwhelmed by grace - a good starting point for worship.

Lead SheetAudio

2. BE STILL MY SOUL

Style: We will sing this classic hymn in its traditional style. It is low-tempo, somber, and contemplative.

Song Info: The melody to this hymn was composed in 1900 by Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. It was written to be a Finnish patriotic song. But the melody is so good and has become so popular that is has been since used as the melody for six different Christian hymns and various other songs. The lyrics were originally written in German by Katharina Amalia Dorothea von Schlegel in 1752.

Altogether this is a stunning hymn. Its content is especially appropriate for those who are suffering. The great theme of this song is that though this Christian life (and all life on earth) is full of suffering, we have hope and comfort in Jesus Christ through his resurrection from the dead. The hymn calls us to be patient in tribulation and to rejoice in hope. Though we suffer now because of illness, tragedy, sin, persecution, and repentance we have the sure and certain hope of resurrection. This makes it so that our present sufferings are not worth comparing to the glory that is to be revealed to us when Jesus returns.

This is an appropriate time in worship to sing this song because it helps us move from praising the glory and grace of God to recognizing our own fallen condition.

Sheet MusicAudio

3. May the Mind of Christ My Savior

Style: We will play the traditional version of this hymn. It is low-temp and orchestral.

Song Info: This hymn comes to us from the nineteenth century and was written by Kate Wilkinson. The music was composed by A. Cyril Barham-Gould. In hymnals it is usually classified as a song about our new life in Christ, particularly about our aspirations to grow in Christ-likeness and follow him. It's typically sung during Ordinary Time according to the church calendar. Little is known about the author because this is the only hymn that we have from her.

My favorite verse is the last one:

May His beauty rest upon me
As I seek the lost to win,
And may they forget the channel,
  Seeing only Him.

Few hymns have us singing about mission. But this line turns our attention outward and encourages us to pray concerning our calling in the world. It reminds us that Jesus is beautiful and asks the Lord that his beauty would be seen in our lives as we live in an unbelieving world.

Sheet Music, Audio

4. Good Shepherd of My Soul

Style: This is a contemporary hymn played in a celtic-folk style. It is mid-tempo and prayerful.

Song Info: This song comes to us from Stuart Townend, Keith and Kristin Getty, and Fionan de Barra. It is a prayer that Christ would dwell within us, transform our lives, and mold us into Christ-likeness. It especially reflects on the difficulty of this journey living in a fallen world. My favorite line is this:

I’ll walk this narrow road
With Christ before me,
Where thorns and thistles grow
And cords ensnare me.
Though doubted and denied,
He never leaves my side,
But lifts my head and calls me to follow.

"Thorns and thistles" is a reference to the fallen world in which we live. We walk with Christ on a narrow road in a land of thorns and thistles. The way of the Christian is difficult. But the good news is that we walk with Christ. Though we doubt him, deny him, and fail him countless times he is always with us, lifting us up and calling us anew to continue following him.

"for the righteous falls seven times and rises again..." (Proverbs 24:16)

"Seven times" indicates completion. Our failure and our sin is complete. It couldn't get any more sinful. Yet because of the presence of Christ with us we rise again and continue on the way. We cannot help but do so thanks to his grace.

Sheet Music, Audio

5. Rock of Ages

Style: We are playing a newer version of this hymn arranged by Dustin Kensrue. It is up-tempo and celebratory with an "indie rock" feel.

Song Info: The original hymn was written in 1763 by Augustus Toplady. Legend has it that one fateful evening Toplady was caught in the wilderness in the midst of a dangerous storm. He took shelter in the cleft of a large rock and this became the inspiration for the hymn: "Rock of ages cleft for me/ let me hide myself in thee." The hymn picks up on the biblical image of Jesus Christ being a "rock of refuge" for his people. The storm of God's wrath will sweep over the earth in order to remove sin. Sinners may take refuge in Jesus Christ to survive this storm.

This hymn was redone by Dustin Kensrue in 2013 and appeared on his album The Water and the Blood. It is appropriate at this moment in worship because of it's celebratory note. In the sermon we've heard about Jesus' work as rescuer and now we are able to enjoy our salvation and celebrate the refuge that he offers to us.

Lead SheetAudio

See you Sunday!