Preparing for Worship - July 2, 2017

Join us this Sunday as we take a look at the Lord's Prayer. The Lord's Prayer is one of the most famous passages of Scripture. It was taught to us by Jesus as a model for prayer. It also has much in common with the Psalms - the prayerbook of God's people. If you're confused about prayer and want to learn how to pray there is no better place to begin than with this prayer.

To view our full liturgy click here. Here are the songs we'll sing together:

1. HAIL TO THE LORD'S ANOINTED

Style: We are playing a contemporary, alt-country version of this old hymn/psalm. It is up-tempo and joyful.

Song Info: The lyrics to this tune were originally composed by Scottish poet, hymn-writer, and activist James Montgomery in 1822. His original lyrics are almost entirely preserved, although slightly altered, by Sandra McCracken in this version that we are singing. She also set the words to new music which she composed. Montgomery's words were based heavily on Psalm 72 and in many Psalters this song is associated with Psalm 72.

Psalm 72 is a Royal Psalm written by King David for his son Solomon. It is a plea for God to give his justice and wisdom to the king so that the reign of the king might bring forth equity and prosperity on earth. This Psalm can be applied to Jesus as "great David's greater son", who is God's anointed king forever. Hail to the Lord's anointed!

Sheet MusicAudio

2. JESUS SHALL REIGN

Style: This is a traditional hymn played in its original style. It is melodic, joyful, energetic, and mid-tempo.

Song Info: This is yet another hymn based on Psalm 72 - one of the most popular Psalms that has been set to music. This hymn was written by Isaac Watts in the eighteenth century. Psalm 72 is a Royal Psalm and is David's prayer and blessing for his son Solomon. Many hymn writers have taken themes from this Psalm and applied them to Jesus - the true and better son of David. That makes this hymn a celebration of Jesus' kingship.

Sheet MusicAudio

3. GOOD SHEPHERD OF MY SOUL

Style: This is a contemporary hymn played in a celtic-folk style. It is mid-tempo and prayerful.

Song Info: This song comes to us from Stuart Townend, Keith and Kristin Getty, and Fionan de Barra. It is a prayer that Christ would dwell within us, transform our lives, and mold us into Christ-likeness. It especially reflects on the difficulty of this journey living in a fallen world. My favorite line is this:

I’ll walk this narrow road
With Christ before me,
Where thorns and thistles grow
And cords ensnare me.
Though doubted and denied,
He never leaves my side,
But lifts my head and calls me to follow.

"Thorns and thistles" is a reference to the fallen world in which we live. We walk with Christ on a narrow road in a land of thorns and thistles. The way of the Christian is difficult. But the good news is that we walk with Christ. Though we doubt him, deny him, and fail him countless times he is always with us, lifting us up and calling us anew to continue following him.

"for the righteous falls seven times and rises again..." (Proverbs 24:16)

"Seven times" indicates completion. Our failure and our sin is complete. It couldn't get any more sinful. Yet because of the presence of Christ with us we rise again and continue on the way. We cannot help but do so thanks to his grace.

Sheet MusicAudio

4. What a Friend We Have In Jesus

Style: We will play this hymn in its traditional style. It is low-tempo and prayerful.

Song Info: This famous and beloved hymn was written in 1855 by Joseph Scriven. This tune, like many great tunes, was not originally written to be seen by anyone but the author's mother. He wrote it for her to comfort her in a time of trouble. The hymn focuses on the blessing of prayer and meditates on the wonderful privilege it is to be able to approach the living God in prayer.

Sheet Music, Audio

5. ALAS! AND DID MY SAVIOR BLEED?

Style: We will be playing the traditional version of this hymn. It is lo-tempo and contemplative.

Song Info: There seem to be hundreds of version of this hymn out there. The lyrics are so powerful that it has been covered and re-arranged by several artists. Yet the traditional hymn was written by Isaac Watts (lyrics) and Hugh Wilson (music) in the 18th century. This tune fits well at this point in the service because it causes us to meditate on our sinful condition before the Lord. Here we move from rejoicing in the Lord and his goodness in creation to our sinful response to God. Though God has showered infinite grace upon us in making us in his image, we have repaid him by rebelling against his rule in our lives. Yet this song is also about God's surprising mercy in sending his own Son to come as man and die for our rebellion.

Sheet MusicAudio

6. O LOVE THAT WILL NOT LET ME GO

Style: We will be singing a more contemporary version of this song arranged by Indelible Grace. It is up-tempo and joyful with a folk-rock feel.

Song Info: The lyrics to this hymn were written in the nineteenth century by Scottish minister and hymn writer George Matheson. Though Matheson wrote several hymns, this is the only one that still enjoys popularity today. Matheson wrote this hymn on the eve of his sister's wedding. Matheson had previously been engaged himself, but his engagement was ended because he was going blind. His bride-to-be decided that she could not live the rest of her life with a blind man and broke the engagement. After that time he was cared for by his sister. But he wrote this hymn at a time when his sister would be married and no longer able to be his primary care taker. Emotionally, Matheson looked to God himself as his care taker. He said that he wrote this hymn in the time frame of five minutes.

Sheet MusicAudio

See you Sunday!